humanoidhistory:

“Quarta musculos commonstrantium figura, omnes in posteriori corporis.” 1543 anatomical illustration, engraving by Jan Stephan van Calcar. 
(Library of Congress)

humanoidhistory:

Quarta musculos commonstrantium figura, omnes in posteriori corporis.” 1543 anatomical illustration, engraving by Jan Stephan van Calcar. 

(Library of Congress)





(Source: anarchyfaith)




all9liveslived:

Anatomy textbooks of yor are amazing! 




scottishwalker:

Anatomy drawing

scottishwalker:

Anatomy drawing





paigecollinsillustration:

Dissection of the brain and skull, pencil crayon.

paigecollinsillustration:

Dissection of the brain and skull, pencil crayon.





(Source: antiqueimages.blogspot.co.uk, via sailsinmyveins)





(Source: outsidesin)





antipahtico:

Ancient Egyptian Mummy ~ Sergio Royzen

antipahtico:

Ancient Egyptian Mummy ~ Sergio Royzen

(Source: ryanmatthewcohn)





thegetty:

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 
This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.
Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum

thegetty:

In 1854 the British Museum hired Roger Fenton to test the newfangled medium of photography to document its collection, rather than the usual modes of drawings and engravings. Fenton was at it for seven and a half years. 

This heavy-footed moa, a massive bird that became extinct following humans’ arrival in New Zealand, was once in the British Museum’s Hall of Fossils. Despite being both dead and flightless, the bird later moved across town to the collection of London’s Natural History Museum.

Dinornis elephantopus, about 1855, Roger Fenton. The J. Paul Getty Museum




fallbabylon:

san gaudioso catacombs- Naples Italy

(via blackpaint20)